DIABETES JUST ISN’T SCARY ENOUGH

ilustrasi-diabetesWhen people hear the word CANCER or LOU GEHRIG’S DISEASE it creates significant fear and emotional duress. These diagnoses create fear and the belief that death is imminent. They incite ACTION.

When people hear the word DIABETES, they think of insulin. They shrug their shoulders at the serious dangers this disease produces. They believe that oral or injectable medications will provide the “SOLUTION” to live out a typically normal life without truly altering their lifestyle. This disease DOES NOT CAUSE FEAR! Why is that?

Is it because it has become viewed as a chronic condition rather than a LIFE THREATENING DISEASE like cancer? How can the 7th leading cause of death amounting to 4.9 million people (1 DEATH EVERY 7 SECONDS) be so INCORRECTLY assessed by our society? Is it possible that my colleagues have attempted to be good humanitarians and soften the blow of this dangerous disease by creating a false belief that pharmaceutical intervention “FIXES” the harmful effects of this disease? Well, this doctor is going to lay it on the line hoping the reality of its message will place both fear and respect of this disease in the same category as any other “terminal disease.” Understand, just because the survival period may exceed other terminal illnesses, doesn’t make it any less lethal.

First, let’s start with an example of a 45 yr. old and some simple statistics:

  • 45 yr. old PRE-diabetics have a 74% chance of developing full blown diabetes.

  • 45 yr. old PRE-diabetics with a HEALTHY BMI (Body Mass Index- a measurement of body mass to height and body weight evaluating health risks) have a 35.9% chance of developing full blown diabetes while those with a BMI >35 (morbidly obese) have an 80.9% chance. This shows that better than 1 in 3 recording a HEALTHY ratio of mass to height and body weight will STILL DEVELOP FULL BLOWN DIABETES.

  • 45 yr. old persons diagnosed by their physicians with Diabetes were prescribed pharmaceutical treatments. 49% of this group began insulin. More than half of this age group chose to do NOTHING. This fact awakened my brain to the realization that the diagnosis of Diabetes did not produce the fear it should have.

  • Finally, a 45 yr. old healthy person had a 48.7% chance of developing PRE-Diabetes and a 31.3% of developing full blown Diabetes.

***(These previous statistics can be found at: Progression From Pre-Diabetes to Type 2 Diabetes)

Most people diagnosed with Diabetes are under the assumption they can basically live their life normally (defined as the way they choose to.) They believe doctors prescribing drugs manage this disease similar to high blood pressure. This is not true. To increase the chances of living a quality of life sustainable for the duration without suffering the severe consequences of this disease, a great deal of effort and education is required. Since most people do not realize this fact or are unwilling to accept the disease and its tragic consequences if not addressed properly (meaning more than simply taking insulin and other pharmacological agents) many people succumb to:

  1. Cardiovascular Disease– Diabetes dramatically increases the risk of various cardiovascular problems, including coronary artery disease with chest pain (angina), heart attack, stroke and narrowing of arteries (atherosclerosis).

  2. Nerve damage (neuropathy) Excess sugar can injure the walls of the tiny blood vessels (capillaries) that nourish your nerves, especially in your legs. This can cause tingling, numbness, burning or pain that usually begins at the tips of the toes or fingers and gradually spreads upward. Left untreated, you could lose all sense of feeling in the affected limbs. Damage to the nerves related to digestion can cause problems with nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or constipation. For men, it may lead to erectile dysfunction.

  3. Kidney damage (nephropathy)- The kidneys contain millions of tiny blood vessel clusters (glomeruli) that filter waste from your blood. Diabetes can damage this delicate filtering system. Severe damage can lead to kidney failure or irreversible end-stage kidney disease, which may require dialysis or a kidney transplant.

  4. Eye damage (retinopathy)- Diabetes can damage the blood vessels of the retina (diabetic retinopathy), potentially leading to blindness. Diabetes also increases the risk of other vision conditions, including cataracts and glaucoma.

  5. Foot damage- Nerve damage in the feet or poor blood flow to the feet increases the risk of various foot complications. Infections resulting from untreated, cuts and blisters often become opportunistic and prevent the body from healing. As these infections spread, they create enormous pain and threaten the body by toxifying the blood supply. In an attempt to save the diabetic’s life, amputations are commonly performed on the toes, feet and legs.

  6. Skin conditions- Diabetes may leave you more susceptible to skin problems, including bacterial and fungal infections. This requires frequent use of antibiotics that lead to gastrointestinal complications causing severe pain and malabsorption. This, in turn, can lead to a “wasting away” condition known as diabetic neuropathic cachexia. This condition is similar in symptoms to the wasting away evidenced in many cancer patients.

Just because a person can SURVIVE with diabetes for years does NOT MEAN a person is LIVING A LIFE OF QUALITY. Underestimating the dangers of this disease has created more unnecessary complications to both victims of this dreaded disease as well as their families.

Just like any disease, some types of Diabetes are not preventable. Regardless, recognizing the devastating effects of this disease should alter everyone’s view and understanding and create an increased level of responsibility when confronted with this diagnosis. For many, poor lifestyle choices have played a vital component leading to the diagnosis. Naturally, there are many other factors that lead to it as well.

NOW THE REALITY

 

IS THIS                                  OR THIS

 

REALLY WORTH

THIS               OR                THIS

.

OR THIS coffin_at_a_cemetery

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42 comments

  1. Oh my god what a shocker.
    Whilst none of us want to get Diabetes, I did always assume that you took medication and that was that.
    I have just joined a slimming club as although I dont really agree with dieting I didn’t seem to be getting far on my own.
    I did have a high sugar diet and have switched to sweetener I realise it isent ideal but is it preferable out of the two ?

    Like

    1. I’m glad you had an opportunity to read this article. This condition is serious and needs a serious approach to prevent the potential devastating effects that Diabetes causes. I agree with your “diet” assessment. For long term health benefits, we need to create food choices that provide quality nutrition that satisfy our body’s needs. It is the source of maintaining a healthy immune system and preventing the body from degenerating and suffering functional and emotional damage. I’m glad to see your awareness about sugar as well. There are over 20 different ingredients in many processed foods that all represent sugar. Many people are also unaware that carbohydrates convert to sugar during digestion. This however,doesn’t mean that all carbohydrates are bad or dangerous.

      Talk to people in your slimming club and see if anyone knows a professional they trust that can help you with your dietary needs. The object is to create a REALISTIC long term approach that includes the foods you enjoy to prevent feelings of deprivation.

      Good health requires a game plan. It’s not just about food or exercise or stress reduction, etc… It’s about all of these and more. This approach is designed to create BALANCE in life leading to a better quality of life and healthier outcome. All it takes is a little guidance from a caring professional and a “student” willing to put the time and effort in to achieve these goals. It’s not easy. If it was, everyone would do it. It all comes down to how the individual views the value of their own life. Are they willing to put the effort needed and remain persistent in finding a new path to succeed? I can assure you, it is absolutely worth the effort. Following a healthier path produces opportunities unforeseen.

      Like

      1. I think that I’m just beginning to realise that it is about a lot more than trying to lose weight. The holistic approach definitely seems like the way to go.
        When you say that its about “valuing your life” that makes it feel like something that you owe it yourself to do, rather than depriving yourself.
        , thankyou.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Thank you Emma. I appreciate your willingness to read through this difficult post. I’m glad you can walk away from its content with a POSITIVE message!

          Like

  2. Oh man, you sure have a way of telling it like it is! You are SO right though to be sounding the alarm about diabetes as it does horrible things to the body, many of which happen BEFORE noticeable symptoms occur.

    I think you hit the nail on the head by saying most people don’t view a diabetes diagnosis as an immediate threat. I don’t know why that is but I honestly felt the same way until I started to seriously digging in to it a couple of years ago when my blood sugar levels were rising a bit for no apparent reason. I had no idea the damage it could cause and thought that only happened to really unhealthy sick people.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Similar to high blood pressure, I call Diabetes the “Silent Killer.” Most people are fooled by this disease because it typically comes on gradually (except for Type I) and slowly reduces the quality of life over time. The end stage of this disease is as horrifying as any other life threatening condition. This is why I provided the graphic content. Sometimes people need to visually see reality to understand it.
      I am so glad to hear you were able to address your own history of elevated blood sugar. For many of us, lifestyle changes can prevent this dangerous disease.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. OMG that is very sickening and eye-opening. Damn! I don’t know about all drs, but I know a lot of our local family doctors just aren’t that concerned. I get a “you numbers are too high, watch your diet and exercise.” My friend’s doctor knew she had it, but didn’t tell her til she confronted him. There is a serious lack of care. You just made me want to puke. You are getting the message through.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. If more doctors became alarmed, more patients would react differently to this disease. I am hoping that this post clears any doubt how dangerous this disease is. The best way for most of us to combat this disease is to avoid it in the first place. Lifestyle is a MAJOR component in many cases.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Shit.
    That really puts it out there.
    I am so lucky I dodged that bullet whilst living precariously.
    I am also so glad I am trying my best to improve my life as much as I can now so I can continue to try and avoid this dreadful disease.
    Sometimes the harsh reality is what is needed.
    Great post.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Sorry about the frankness, but sometimes directness proves more effective. There are so many people clearly missing the severity of this disease, I felt obligated to bring the reality to the forefront. I hope people view Diabetes more seriously and take steps to avoid becoming its next victim.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. And you did just that for sure.
        Scary.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Reblogged this on and commented:
    He tells it like it is.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. My primary doctor never said a word to me about diabetes. In fact, I received the diagnosis over the phone, from one of the women in the doctor’s office, might have been a secretary, might have been a nurse,but she did not identify her category, just raced down a list of the results of my latest bloodwork which had included an A1c test. “Oh, and you have diabetes.” and she was rattling on as if she’d mentioned it might rain tomorrow. My doctor didn’t see any reason I might want to take a course on, “So, you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes.”. I actually had to fight to get that much. I see many doctors, including an endocrinologist but I am truly on my own with this disease. The doctors just don’t seem to consider it significant. I feel it’s something to find out about, as much as I can, to see how I’m doing, to understand the progression, yet, that information is not offered by my doctors. What’s wrong with this picture? They KNOW STUFF but never manage to mention it to me. Do they presume everyone knows everything? I do a lot of research because I’m on my own.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I am so sorry to hear the manner of health care service provided regarding your exam and lab findings as well as the lack of any coordinated effort to help you understand your diagnosis and treatment options. You are a smart person to do as much research as possible. You might want to schedule a consultation with your primary physician to make him or her aware of your concerns. Diabetes is a serious diagnosis and demands a thorough explanation and game plan to help resolve or at the very least, improve the outcome. If you find your doctor unresponsive, I would suggest to begin shopping for a new doctor. Everyone deserves a courteous and professional response from their doctors. They have an ethical and moral obligation to help their patients achieve the best quality of health possible. The patients, however, also have an obligation to place the necessary effort into accomplishing this mutual goal.

      Please don’t hesitate to ask questions if you become confused by the explanations given by your doctors. I will gladly offer any assistance I can.

      Thank you for sharing your experiences and your story. I’m certain other readers will be able to relate to your frustration.

      Like

  7. OK, now you’ve done it! This is shocking, but it is the truth and even though i now about the risks of diabetes I have never seen any article, pamphlet or brochure actually show people. Well done.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The reality of this disease is so devastating, I felt compelled to provide a realistic written and visual explanation to clarify misconceptions. Although it’s graphic, I believe the “scared straight” approach might be more effective at saving people from going down this path. Thanks for your feedback.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Do you have any statistics as it relates to the introduction of soft drinks and white bread vs diabetes diagnosed?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I don’t Frank, but these foods along with processed foods are certainly contributing to the alarmingly growing rates diagnosed. Countless people are walking around without any clue of the damage this disease is causing. It is truly a “silent killer” as it advances and ultimately becomes symptomatic. How do we get people to understand that waiting until this point reduces our chances of preventing the eventual damage? Closing one’s eyes to the reality doesn’t make the disease disappear.

      Like

  9. Great post!

    Marcey

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much Marcey. If this post awakens 1 person, the time spent writing it was worth it!

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Wow. You delivered a tough love message. Your post educated me about Diabetes. Thanks for sharing this. Happy Sunday.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. There are some health issues that will never be viewed in a way to create the attention and awareness necessary to battle their detrimental outcomes. Diabetes is one of those diseases. We are a culture that responds to PAIN and PLEASURE. I’m hoping the pain seen and felt in this post motivates more people to change their current dangerous lifestyles to experience the true pleasures a healthy lifestyle provides. I’m glad you found the information educational.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. The tough message in the article was loud and clear.

        Liked by 1 person

  11. Reblogged this on REBEL WITH A CAUSE and commented:
    I am of normal weight, life weights a few times a week (when I ‘m not in a critical low back pain flare…) um, I eat salads (really green ones) I eat Jerusalem Artichokes and take Cinnamon for blood sugar control, eat 85% raw food, no sugar exept for one glass of wine, which they say is good for diabetes…But because of my atypical antipsychotic (Clozaril..older and more side effect-laden but a miracle drug for my Tardive Dyskinesia) I’m prediabetic. I’m on Metformin and I’m walking down that road. I’m scared of the self care that diabetes requires. What if I fall back into a depression and have trouble making salads, going out to shop for the greens and chop them and crave sweets to escape my mood? What happens then? My years of bipolar illness and lack of good grooming and hygiene have nearly lost me all of my teeth. I’m fighting for quality of life. Then again, all those healthy habits I’m describing may leave me still alive and kicking at 85 years of age, inhabiting a painful brain and body that I’m fricing tired of living in! Even though Bipolar I, and having had times where I wanted to die (and sometimes self medicated with My Seroquel to escape it), I’m not particularly suicidal. I’m afraid I will botch it up and …then there is the Tardive Dyskinesia, which makes physicians inclined NOT to want to treat you. Then there is the Bipolar Disorder itself, tending to make doctors shy away. I once had a dermatologist tell me, when I was suffering with Shingles and Manic due to all the cortisone I was given, warn me not to ‘act up,’ or he would fire me. You wouldn’t believe the callousness of neurologists who supposedly specialize in movement disorders but that means MS, Parkinson’s, not someone who is mentally ill with side effects from psych meds. I’m already swimming in a Sea of Side Effects. As I age, I’m trying to minimize the damage. That’s why the Jerusalem artichokes, the Sencha Tea (eliminates the sugar cravings)…the cinnamon and the diet. Sometimes it feels impossible, truly. Great Article. But he’s preaching to the choir. I am scared.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Sounds like you have been doing some homework. When a person begins taking responsibility for their actions they generally have better outcomes. Life is scary without physical or mental challenges. I encourage you to SLOWLY continue to research the different aspects of health that help heal the body and bring it back to a state of corrective BALANCE. Our bodies and our minds love to be cared for. Challenges simply make the task a little more complicated. Doctor’s are fearful because of our litigious society. Many would love to offer treatment straying from protocol, but can’t out of fear of lawsuits. Make sure you have confidence with your doctors and make certain your input is understood by them. When the patient and doctor understand and communicate well, the results are substantially improved. It’s easy for me to suggest you let go of your fear. Rather than doing this, I would offer you focus on the positive changes you have mentioned and allow the healing effects increase your self confidence and self awareness. This will likely reduce the fear. Wishing you only the best.

      Like

  12. Wow! What a powerful post! I need to show this to my dad… he has type 2 and is totally non-compliant… won’t listen to me at all… maybe he’ll listen to you! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m hoping this post places this disease in proportion to its damaging effects. People truly do not understand how dangerous it is. They believe that pharmaceutical agents “manage” the condition. They typically slow down the process; they do not FIX THE DISEASE. It needs to be recognized as a DISEASE, not a condition. Wishing your father wisdom in changing the course he’s following.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Agree – thank you, Jonathan

        Liked by 1 person

  13. As someone who has very close relatives with diabetes, this post could not be more on point. It’s frustrating to see loved ones not get on board with better nutrition when they have this disease or worse when they see someone else with it and do the same things that person did to get it!! Thank you for sharing. Light and Love, Shona

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m sorry for the emotions you must experience as well as the suffering your relatives may be going through. It is really quite simple; we can learn through PAIN or we can learn through PLEASURE. People need to make this choice for themselves. All I try to do is offer guidance if they seek the route of pleasure.

      Liked by 1 person

  14. Oh yeah, it’s so bad. My dad calls it “sugar cancer.” I have some unusual risk factors that are outside my control so my endocrinologist recommends that I not ever weigh over 120 lbs. That hasn’t been hard so far, but my mom keeps warning me it’s going to get a lot harder in a couple of years when my metabolism naturally slows down.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Obviously I don’t know your medical history, but in most cases, metabolic activity can be fairly well regulated through lifestyle changes. In most cases, the metabolism slows down in response to activities, energy expenditure and nutritional consumption. Various physiology also can affect metabolic changes (thyroid, hypothalamus, menopause, etc…) but the various components that lead to healthier outcomes can greatly influence these changes.

      When I was in practice I took the fear out of disease my creating greater understanding of health. We don’t have to do special things to prevent cancer, heart disease, strokes, etc… We need to create and focus on a balanced lifestyle. “FEEDING” good health prevents disease and suffering. These basic “feeding” components include: (1) good nutrition, (2) exercise, (3) proper sleep, (4) channeling and reducing stress, (5) proper hydration, (6) social, spiritual and emotional balance and (7) proper nerve function (to allow proper communication for all systems in the body to function.)
      Good health is more than just the absence of disease.

      Like

  15. Thanks for a hard-hitting post that may well wake up some people.

    There may be some who realize that injections alone cannot control diabetes but hope that injections along with better-late-than-never attention to diet can do the trick. Eating safely after diabetes has taken hold, however, is even harder than it looks. Knowing what would spike blood sugar in most people is NOT the same as knowing what would spike it in any particular person. I happened to see a summary of recent work on that difference at about the same time as I read your great post:
             https://www.sciencenews.org/article/good-diet-you-may-be-bad-me

    Liked by 1 person

    1. There are many variables that affect people’s blood sugar responses to food and lifestyle. That being said, there are lifestyle components that assist most people in regulating blood sugar. Customizing these components to each individual produces the best chances for success at controlling this disease. As the article stated in the link you added, what is good for one person may be detrimental to the next. Establishing a realistic plan of action that the diabetic WILL FOLLOW is an important variable. Even if this approach is successful, factors such as anti-inflammatory medications (corticosteroids) can blow sugar levels off the chart.

      Moral of the story: Those that blind themselves to balanced living may find themselves victims and hostages to their own bodies. In many cases this outcome can certainly be avoided. A “head in the sand” approach to the dangers of this disease may find the rest of the body joining it, but about 6 feet deeper.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. YES. Sometimes we all can use a dose of reality! Thank you for never being passive in your messages.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hopefully this changes people’s opinion of Diabetes. It kills me as I watch the numbers grow. We doctors need to do a better job communicating this reality.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. When i was diagnosed with diabetes my mind went instantly to injury/gangrene/amputation/death. On the ‘up’ side – it has brought me to an incredible change in diet that has my blood sugar moving towards the LOW side of ‘normal’ (which gets my doctor off my case, lol)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m glad he got on your “case”. It shows he cares! Congratulations on correcting this problem. Now the trick is keeping it corrected forever.

      Like

  18. Howto$tuffYourPig · · Reply

    This scares me to death! I know someone who doesn’t take his diabetic condition seriously so I have to assume he may endure some of these very symptoms in the future. I wish this message would reach more people!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The more times the message is repeated the more effective it becomes.There are some who refuse the reality of this disease. These are the ones that generally suffer the greatest harm. The goal becomes finding those lacking and seeking information; to find those willing to commit to the necessary lifestyle changes in return for healthier lives. They are out there and I am working hard to find them.

      Liked by 1 person

  19. I am a diabetes survivor. It, along with high blood pressure and a misuse of some medications, caused me to have a hemorrhagic stroke and die. I managed to revive and reenter life to find that I am now disabled, have some neuropathy, balance issues, double vision, and memory problems.
    TAKE CARE OF YOUR DIABETES!

    Like

    1. Thank you for sharing your personal story. More people need to understand the reality of disease and the affects it causes on life if we don’t properly modify our poor lifestyle choices. Your story becomes more than words on a computer monitor. It becomes the devastating effects that anyone may face.
      Wishing you happiness and improved health for all the days that follow.
      My call to action would modify your final sentence. It would read: TAKE CARE OF YOUR HEALTH! In doing so, we may be able to avoid having to take care of diseases.

      Liked by 1 person

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