BIRTH TO ADOLESCENCE

The following flow chart provides a comparison between two children showing a non traditional vs traditional nutritional pattern of food selections resulting in two very different likely outcomes.

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To avoid a “fussy” eater, it starts with YOU and the selections you offer your child. If you begin early with processed high sugary foods, it will become much more difficult later on to get your child to comply with healthier choices.

Do some research and talk with your pediatrician (if they are well versed in nutritional studies) to formulate the best game plan for your child. If you’re not convinced your doctor is well qualified in the area of nutrition, find a certified nutritionist specializing in childhood nutrition.

The answer to our growing overweight and obesity epidemic starts with YOU and your own family. Why not give them a chance to experience a healthy thriving childhood rather than increasing their chances for diseases and conditions that put them at higher risks for DISABILITY and DEATH.

DON’T YOU AGREE THEY DESERVE IT!

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29 comments

  1. sadly I think some parents are just TOO lazy to really care .. feed them the fast food, entertain them with a tablet … seems little encouragement to eat or play wisely

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Sometimes you have to wonder if our PRIORITIES haven’t become a little scrambled.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. ‘little’ is a gross understatement Doc!

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  2. so true…..xx

    Liked by 1 person

    1. A flow chart can sometimes show a visual explanation that people understand better.

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      1. yes I am thinking that would work along with a daily journal that breaks down all the food you eat….

        Liked by 1 person

        1. I’m a BIG believer in journaling food intake. I’ve entered all my foods (except vacations) since 1995. So many people are under the assumption food journaling is a punishment for people wanting to lose weight. It is actually an important method to understand what you’re eating and how this affects your health.

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          1. I agree and that is what I am going to start doing as soon as we get home and regroup, I feel extremely scattered and unable to keep a straight thought at the moment…its been non stop hectic since the accident….really looking forward to getting back to home, our beds, and just taking a deep breath….but yes, I agree I need to keep a journal, do you keep all the info regarding the food too…like, sodium content, fat, calorie…etc???

            Liked by 1 person

            1. I place my foods in a computer program that tracks the macro and micro-nutrients. It also tracks my exercise. Literally, takes me 5 minutes/day to enter EVERYTHING! I recommend, however, to enter each meal after completion if possible. Trying to remember everything eaten at the end of the day is challenging.

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              1. I have been using fat secret on my phone….and I try to do it before I eat as my small brain seems to forget more than it remembers these days…LOL it also has an exercise journal….so I guess that would be time wise rather than keeping a hand written journal….thanks

                Liked by 1 person

                1. I also enter foods as I eat them, or write them down on paper and keep it in my pocket. There is no way I can remember the foods (and quantity) that I eat each day. The computer program makes it easy for me.
                  Let me know how your phone app works for you.

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                2. thanks I have been down loading and looking at new apps….haven’t found the write one yet, but only have looked at 3 so far….Happy weekend my friend….xxkat

                  Liked by 1 person

                3. Back at ya! 🙂

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  3. I could not agree more ! Sad truths. I always feel so sorry for the kid who did not even ask to be brought into this world and now he has to live this life !

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You’d be surprised at how many parents don’t even realize their child is overweight or even obese. Denial is a strong emotion. Accepting the reality and responsibility for a child’s weight problem could push a parent over the edge into depression. Everyone loses if this happens.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. I agree completely. Whereas I gave both of my children formula because of personal issues…fast food was never a staple in their diet. I have an amazing pediatrician that has always been there from day one to guide us on the right path. It is an amazing thing when you have the right people to guide you and give you real choices when deciding what is best.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Having a supportive network of trustworthy people (including physicians) makes the journey easier to accomplish. I hope people read your comment to see the VALUE of a supportive network rather than attempting to “wear all hats” on their own. It is too complicated to handle alone in most cases.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. You are right, of course. If we start them on good food, besides them benefiting from it immediately, they will be more likely to choose it as they grow up. It wouldn’t hurt to get them active early, too. I think kids that learn the joys of movement and exercise are getting a lesson that will last them an extended lifetime.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You’re right, Tony. Food is certainly not the entire picture. Exercise/movement is another critical piece of the puzzle.

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  6. This is a fabulous post. It absolutely starts with the parents. Unfortunately, most young parents were raised on the same S.A.D. / refined foods diet they are giving their own children. It takes research and the desire to change. Sadly, it normally takes a tragic event/disease to get a parent’s attention and create that desire. Thanks for sharing. Hopefully it caught the attention of a diligent parent. 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I have stated many times that PAIN and PLEASURE are the two motivating factors that elicit change in life. Since both produce positive changes, why would anyone seek “tragedy” when “pleasure” offers the same outcome? We need to begin thinking in terms of PRO-ACTIVE rather than RE-ACTIVE.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes, we should think that way, but most people don’t. They just “coast along” in life, half asleep in many ways. They are oblivious, lulled into a false sense of “pleasure” or “security” until something tragic wakes them into reality.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. I think it takes “gentle” persistence. People are stubborn and require hearing new concepts repeatedly before ever considering modifying lifestyles. I believe in people and believe (STRONGLY) they’re worth the effort!

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Indeed. We are learning about this in school now, how to gently motivate ppl to want to change. Yes gentle persistence is key.

            Liked by 1 person

  7. I wish everyone would read this!! My 7 year old chose grilled fish and steamed broccoli for lunch today. He’s never eaten a hamburger, his choice. He doesn’t like fast food. He does get treats on special occasion. He has learned this behavior, at least to some degree from me, and I hope he lives a long and healthy, happy life. I wish this for all kids. Now is the time to start. Great read!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you. You have obviously put the time in to teach your child a REALISTIC lifestyle that maximizes healthy food choices without sacrificing reasonable quantities of treats or (what I call) comfort foods. Achieving a healthy BALANCE is the key to long term success. I hope many parents read your comment to see just how possible this is to achieve.

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  8. […] BIRTH TO ADOLESCENCE […]

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    1. I really look forward to your list of “Weekly Headlines.” It is merely a bonus when I see some of my writings included. I appreciate your recognition and your help passing these messages forward.

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