HOW WOULD I HANDLE BORDERLINE OR INTERMITTENT DISEASES/CONDITIONS versus YOUR DOCTOR?

Publication5CROPPED425Borderline and intermittent diseases/conditions often exist without symptoms (or with occasional symptoms) leaving most people capable of living a life without obvious restrictions. Some of these diseases/conditions might include borderline high blood pressure, borderline high cholesterol, borderline type 2 diabetes, borderline depression, borderline overweight, borderline under/overactive thyroid and intermittent indigestion.

Let’s look at a common medical approach to these conditions:

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…AFTER AN EXAM IS PERFORMED…

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BORDERLINE HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE:

The most common approach would be a “wait and see” approach to monitor if the values worsen or prescribe a pharmaceutical prescription(s) including: lisinopril, atenolol, norvasc, toprol… or one of the remaining (approx.) 500+ prescriptions available to MANAGE blood pressure.

BORDERLINE HIGH CHOLESTEROL:

The most common approach would be a “wait and see” approach to monitor if the values worsen or prescribe a pharmaceutical prescription(s) including: lipitor, simvastatin, crestor, zocor or one of the remaining (approx.) 44+ prescriptions available to MANAGE high cholesterol.

BORDERLINE TYPE II DIABETES:

The most common approach would be a “wait and see” approach to monitor if the values worsen or prescribe a pharmaceutical prescription(s) including: metformin, parlodel, nesina, avandia, victoza or one of the remaining “best” 67+ prescriptions available to MANAGE type II diabetes.

BORDERLINE DEPRESSION:

The most common approach would NOT WAIT AND SEE, but instead would prescribe a pharmaceutical prescription(s) for: cymbalta, zoloft, lexapro, celexa, prozac or one or the remaining “top” 112+ prescriptions available to MANAGE depression.

BORDERLINE OVERWEIGHT:

The most common approach would be a “wait and see” approach to monitor weight values. If they worsen, a pharmaceutical prescription(s) would likely be written for: xenical, belviq, contrave, saxenda, or one of the remaining (approx.) 6+ prescriptions available to MANAGE weight problems.

BORDERLINE THYROID IMBALANCE:

The most common approach would be a “wait and see” approach to monitor if the values worsen or prescribe a pharmaceutical prescription(s) including: cytomel, levothyroid, triostat, synthroid, methimazole, or one of the remaining (approx.) 40+ prescriptions available to MANAGE thyroid dysfunction.

INTERMITTENT INDIGESTION:

The most common approach would NOT BE a “wait and see” approach. Doctors would likely recommend over the counter indigestion relief sources including rolaids, tums, prilosec, etc… If these were not effective, doctors would then choose a pharmaceutical prescription including: famotidine zantac, deprizine or one of the remaining (approx.) 115+ prescriptions available.

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HOW WOULD MY APPROACH DIFFER?

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SIMILAR PAPER WORK, BUT …AFTER MY EXAMINATION…

including past history, family history, lifestyle analysis and physical exam, I would address the ROOT CAUSES that lead to the development of the SYMPTOMS resulting in borderline high blood pressure, borderline high cholesterol, borderline type 2 diabetes, borderline depression, borderline overweight, borderline under/overactive thyroid and intermittent indigestion. You would leave my office with an understanding WHY these symptoms/conditions likely developed and a GAME PLAN requiring  your ACTIVE participation to CORRECT (NOT SIMPLY  MANAGE/MAINTAIN) these symptoms/conditions. You would leave my office with an approach creating this mental picture:

 Publication1 CROPPED 600

instead of this mental picture:

Publication2 cropped400

IT COMES DOWN TO THIS:

  1. Do you want to RESTORE HEALTH or MAINTAIN CHRONIC DISEASE?

  2. Do you want to enjoy the QUALITY of GOOD HEALTH or COMPLAIN about the misery of POOR HEALTH?

  3. Do you want to gain CONTROL over your LIFE or rely on your medical doctors FOREVER to CONTROL it for you?

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DO YOU WANT TO LEARN TO TAKE CHARGE OR BE LEAD?

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23 comments

  1. This post is the core of why I love your approach! Thanks for the reminder that we have a great deal of control over our health.

    I spoke with my mother today and she was telling me how her back pain was worsening. She went into her script about how at her age, these things should be expected. She’s only 58 with multiple medical problems that could be improved with behavior change.

    I countered her idea of inevitable illness by sharing about a nurse’s assistant I work with who is close to 80, proactive about wellness, perfectly healthy and very vibrant. My mother argued that it’s impossible. She takes several medications, doesn’t exercise and eats poorly. I can’t convince her to do otherwise.

    It’s always so validating to hear your approach. I’ll keep passing your posts on to my mom and cross my fingers. 🙂

    Liked by 3 people

    1. You can tell her I’m her age!! (Technically I’ll be 58 in August.) Ill health is NOT inevitable at this age. I am quite pleased with the state of my health.

      I have also learned that telling a parent what’s needed is often met with great resistance. Asking leading questions to get them to come up with the right answers is more effective. If the words come out of their mouth, there is a better chance for compliance. All you have to do is AGREE with “their idea.” Parents can be very challenging, but this is the same thing they said about us as children! 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I will definitely share that with her! You’re right, I do have to frame it differently, which it’s sometimes hard to do because of my own frustration over their lack of proactive measures. And you’re also right that it’s SO coming full circle. lol

        Liked by 1 person

        1. It’s so much easier to uncover possible solutions from the “outside.” I can’t tell you how many times people offered me suggestions that I was shocked I never considered myself.

          Liked by 1 person

  2. Great post, enjoyed reading it

    Liked by 1 person

    1. So glad you enjoyed it and were willing to take the time to read and comment on it. This blog site is all about communication and sharing ideas with each other.

      Like

  3. I personally go to a doctor for a diagnosis if not feeling well and afterwards I research options for a treatment tailored for me that is not a prescription drug unless my life depends on it. I have been lucky to have doctors who listen and respect my choices just as I respect their expertise and knowledge to apply it appropriately if and when needed.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You are one very smart person. Using a doctor for their skill to help YOU decide your best option is an approach I strongly encourage. I hope many readers see your comment. It can help them make better decisions in their lives.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. To begin with, I will chose the doctor with the toned arms, radiant smile and inspiring energy. I can trust that he’s not going to be quick to prescribe but rather to advice me on how to work hard and follow in his steps. The approach in my country is still slightly different but helas pharma is becoming big here too and some doctors are bowing to pressure and all. The bottom line is if we are aware in time and do some research ourselves of our options and not rely so desperately on the doctor

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It used to drive my patients crazy when they would come to me for solutions and I would turn to them and ask, “so what do you think?” Naturally, they would respond with, “your supposed to tell me!” I would respond with, “I’m only willing to do that if you don’t have the answer.” I would follow this with, “so tell me, what aspects of your life are OUT OF BALANCE permitting your current predicament?” They would fill in the details and I would say, “why not consider handling the out of balance part FIRST before calling me next time.” This approach created more smiling patients than you can imagine!

      Like

      1. Sometimes I wonder how come I started real learning only at age 30? I hope I have half as much time to put all what am leading into practice. Thank you so much for all you share

        Liked by 1 person

        1. I’m sure you have already helped many more lives than you’re aware of. Stay true to your heart and all else (naturally) follows.

          Stay healthy and happy!

          Liked by 1 person

  5. Let’s see…I’ll take the doctor on the LEFT! Great post and as I’ve said before I wish there were more health professionals who thought the way you do. We’d all be much better off.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Doctor Lynn. Hopefully as more information is shared and doctors begin accepting new realities, our patients will become the benefactors.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. All I can say is, Thank You !

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Always appreciate your kind words, Lynne.

      Like

  7. Great post…..very informational….I read it twice….got something from it both times…I will be back to read this one again soon…..xxkat Happy Easter

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, Kat. It means a lot to me.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Bravo!! And without hesitation I too would choose the Doctor on the left. I am also forwarding on your out to a few people I know who will appreciate your hope-filled approach!! Hugs & Blessings to you for the care & concern you have for those you treat!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for sharing. There are so many good health choices people can avail themselves to, but the thought process never occurs to them. I hope my articles offer constructive solutions and alternative approaches to get people THINKING and considering greater SELF involvement in their own health.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. […] HOW WOULD I HANDLE BORDERLINE OR INTERMITTENT DISEASES versus YOUR DOCTOR? […]

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  10. […] HOW WOULD I HANDLE BORDERLINE OR INTERMITTENT DISEASES versus YOUR DOCTOR? […]

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