Type II Diabetes: Stop Thinking Sugar and Start Thinking Insulin!

50 percent smallerType II Diabetes may be a health concern for the growing population, but it is a “cash cow” for the pharmaceutical industry. This industry continues to develop new and “improved” drugs to lower blood sugar and lower A1C blood values.

ISN’T THIS A GOOD THING?

.

Although it sounds like a good thing, type II diabetes is an:

INSULIN RESISTANCE PROBLEM,

NOT

A SUGAR PROBLEM

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WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE?

Insulin is a hormone released by the pancreas in response to circulating sugar in the blood. This sugar comes from dietary consumption of foods containing carbohydrates. When these sugars are not burned as fuel (example: sedentary vs. active lifestyle) they must be removed from the blood and stored within the cells of the body. Each cell has receptor sites that allow insulin to escort sugar molecules into the cell. Over time, these receptor sites become altered and damaged from the elevated insulin levels needed to contend with the elevated blood sugar levels making them “less sensitive” to insulin. With this reduced sensitivity, insulin and sugar begin accumulating in the bloodstream. The body responds by releasing even larger quantities of insulin in an attempt to “force” the accumulated sugar into the cells. This mechanism leads to further damage of receptor sites.

Anytime the body is “damaged” it produces a response to repair itself. This repair process is known as INFLAMMATION. Inflammation (ex. “swelling” around a cut on a finger) is supposed to be short term. With poor dietary habits and poor lifestyle choices, the inflammation becomes chronic (ongoing.) A HEALTHY initial inflammatory response that remains ongoing becomes destructive over time as it begins to lose its ability to distinguish damaged tissue from healthy tissue. This is more commonly known as an AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE.

As dietary habits remain unchanged over time, the pancreas begins losing its ability to produce insulin to keep pace with blood sugar levels. Without healthy insulin sensitivity, blood sugar levels continue to rise to the point the patient becomes diagnosed as diabetic. At this point doctors begin prescribing medications. They diligently begin monitoring blood sugar and A1C hemoglobin and adjust the medications to increase insulin levels and decrease blood sugar. Over time, prescription dosages are increased and additional new prescriptions are added to the treatment protocol to increase levels of blood insulin. This FAILING APPROACH ultimately places the individual at increased risk for heart disease, kidney disease, pancreatic and bladder cancers, gastrointestinal disease, Alzheimer’s disease as well as other serious health complications.

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WHERE IS THE FAULTY THINKING IN THIS APPROACH?

The problem isn’t too little insulin; the problem is INSULIN RESISTANCE. (EXAMPLE: If a person can’t stop bleeding, the solution isn’t unlimited intravenous blood transfusions; the solution is getting the blood to clot and repairing the area of blood loss.) In the case of Type II Diabetes, reducing the sugar intake and burning the circulating sugar (by living an ACTIVE lifestyle) will reduce the elevated levels of sugar and allow the insulin receptor sites on the cells to HEAL! A healthy dietary approach will also help correct the chronic INFLAMMATION restoring healthy function to the body.

Ask your physician if long term use of diabetic medications place additional stress and potential damage on the liver, kidneys, heart, digestive tract and immune system. I am confident, they will acknowledge these substantial risks, but will offer few alternatives to their current prescription recommendations. The good news is, they don’t have to. You can control the outcome in most cases if you’re willing to live a lifestyle that promotes GOOD HEALTH. This lifestyle is not designed exclusively for Type II Diabetics; it is designed to improve function and quality for each and every one of us.

Living a HEALTHY LIFESTYLE isn’t a punishment; it is a requirement that improves the odds of achieving the quality of life one chooses to live. Recognizing this concept is the first step needed to change behavior. The second step is assuming personal responsibility for learning ALL YOU CAN to achieve the outcome of choice. The final step requires finding a qualified (FUNCTIONAL) physician willing and CAPABLE of using MODERN TECHNOLOGY to find the UNDERLYING CAUSES of INSULIN RESISTANCE instead of simply treating the SYMPTOMS of elevated blood sugar!

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Will you continue to follow a path of increasing medications or CHOOSE TO LEARN a better alternative option to restoring GOOD HEALTH to your body?

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71 comments

  1. Being a diabetic, the doctor did indeed start the medication route. I, on the other hand, changed diet and lifestyle. After my actions, “miraculously”, my A1C dropped – to below even the doctor’s “target”. Of course, getting him to acknowledge it and adjust medications accordingly is not working. He did all the work. While my lifestyle adjustments were “good to do” – they are not behind my better numbers.
    Just changed doctors. Hopefully the new one will work WITH me instead of just ON me.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Good for you. Traditional medical doctors were never trained in evaluating and treating Type II Diabetes as I discuss in this post. This is not stated to discredit them in any way. Times are changing and ROOT CAUSE health care is gaining greater credibility based on clinical evidence and outcomes. Treating the WHOLE PERSON to restore health simply makes more sense than treating and maintaining chronic diseases.
      I’m glad you stuck to your guns and decided to seek out another doctor. If you continue to have a difficult time, look up “FUNCTIONAL MEDICINE AND CERTIFIED PHYSICIAN.” There are many Chiropractic, Naturopathic and Allopathic physicians that have integrated this approach of health care into their practices.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. finding one under one’s insurance is the fun part

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Even more bad news… Functional medicine doctors are not covered by health insurance. It seems the system prefers to promulgate a dependency on pharmacology; a legalized form of pusher (doctor) and addict (patient.) A truly sad reality!

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Very much so. Fortunately I have found a naturopath who is able to work with me on the non-pharma methods of being healthy.

            Liked by 1 person

            1. Glad you found this type of physician. I’ll bet you will be significantly happier with the outcome of care.

              Liked by 1 person

  2. I think this is one of the most important posts you’ve done. Thank you for putting this together, Jonathan!

    My children are looking into raising a large breed of dog, and they have had to research all the dietary needs of a quickly growing puppy as well as the importance of high quality food and proper exercise so the dog can live a healthy life. That all became a catalyst for talking to them about their own diets and exercise and WHY it is so important that they put effort toward their health in a proactive way. We spent part of the weekend with a “recovering” diabetic who is maintaining his health without medications now. These are all powerful lessons, and I hope they remember them.

    Excellent work, my friend!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I tried leaving out as much technical language as possible without diluting the meaning of this post. I hope people understand there are better options available than the current path so many follow.
      I love the way you integrated the needs of a pet into your children’s understanding of personal dietary and lifestyle needs. Children are much more receptive (even if it doesn’t make them happy) when they understand the “WHY” of what they are asked to do.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I just think this is such an important topic. Type II Diabetes is highly preventable, and it is heartbreaking to see the damage that is needlessly done to lives. I know several people who let their health go at one point in life who are now managing this disease with good food and exercise.

        It is a good battle to be fighting!

        Liked by 1 person

        1. I watched people deny the relevance of lifestyle modifications throughout my career only to see resulting blindness, amputated limbs and unnecessary early deaths. I agree with you… it is a battle worth fighting!

          Liked by 1 person

  3. I am not taking medications if I don’t need them. Why fix something that isn’t broken? My diabetes is under control according to my doctor.

    We are over-medicated already so why make it worse. All medications have side effects to counteract which you take yet another medication. This can continue pretty much in a domino effect pattern. No thanks.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. If I understand your comment correctly, I agree with you that adding additional medications to reduce blood sugar is a never ending losing battle. Taking steps to heal insulin receptor sites to “normal” sensitivity makes much greater sense. Reducing the inflammatory damage makes much greater sense. Lifestyle and diet play big factors in both of these issues. Naturally, lab profiles detailing other important variables will help the physician address all issues contributing to the problems at hand.

      Like

  4. @Tanya Cliff: I want to comment on your statement of “recovering” from diabetes. I’ve never taken any diabetes meds and my numbers are under control. Yet I still have diabetes.

    Just saying

    Liked by 1 person

    1. A common definition of type II diabetes is defined as follows:
      Type 2 Diabetes is a long term metabolic disorder that is characterized by high blood sugar, insulin resistance, and relative lack of insulin.
      You state your numbers are under control, but my guess is you are referring to blood sugar and A1C numbers. Since these numbers are the result (NOT THE CAUSE) of type II diabetes, your definition of “having diabetes,” may differ from mine. When doctors talk about “reversing” diabetes, they are referring to patients who are no longer insulin resistant and require no medications to maintain normal glucose uptake by the cells in their bodies. If these same patients return to a lifestyle that initiated their problems, they will once again “develop” diabetes.
      What are you basing your definition of “having diabetes” on?

      Like

  5. Hi! Great article, clear and helpful.
    I was wondering if you would consider writing something specifically about inflammation? ( or perhaps direct me to any post that covers it). I’ve been having inflammation off and on in my knee for a few years. I’m a pretty healthy eater, (don’t eat junk food, major on fruit and veg, easy on sugars, dairy and gluten etc.) cycle, do yoga and garden a lot (the latter seems to irritate it though) yet my knee never totally recovers.
    My doctor simply suggests I take ibuprofen as needed and puts it down to old age, but I don’t like to take anti inflammatories much as I’ve heard bad stuff about them (don’t seem to help either). I know inflammation is very common so some natural general do and don’ts might help a lot of folks. Just a thought.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It will be my pleasure. Why don’t you click on my “contact” tab and copy and paste your comment so I can answer properly in an email reply.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. OK great I’ll do that. Thanks.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Excellent post! It’s amazing that we forget about being healthy.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We have a tendency to get hung up in the treatment of “disease” rather than focusing on the steps necessary to restoring GOOD HEALTH. Over time this attitude and approach will gain greater acceptance.

      Liked by 2 people

  7. Very interesting. The more I read your posts on health the more I am seeing the health industry focused on fixing the symptoms not the underlying problem. Unfortunately its not that different from the finance industry.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I agree. I have on a number of occasions mentioned a similar analogy in response to your posts.

      Like

  8. great article….thanks…its like you always know what I need to read…thanks…kat

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Always a pleasure.

      Like

      1. whoooo hooooo I got my labs….my A1C is 5.5….whoooo hooooo no longer prediabetic….yeah….my TSH and Vit D are all in normal range….so happy I am doing the weight loss dance as I type…..I am doing something right…!!!! Had to share….kat

        Like

        1. A lot of hard work that seems to have PAID OFF! Don’t let up from the “gas pedal.” Keep the momentum humming FORWARD. You should be very proud of yourself. 🙂

          Like

          1. Thanks Jonathan…I am sighing a huge breath of relief and pure happiness…makes me want to work even harder….I am keeping the healthy eating in check..and working on exercising…..its nice when the hard work shows up in the most important ways….YAY

            Liked by 1 person

          2. Thank you for always being so encouraging…it helps more than you know……XXkat

            Liked by 1 person

            1. Remember, my encouragement is born from all your hard work. As you have learned, living a healthier lifestyle requires effort and commitment. Making the decision and following it through has provided you with the rewards. I hope this is a path that becomes a lifelong trail.

              Like

              1. thanks I love the feeling it has given to me…..it seems like forever since I have had this wonderful inner feeling about myself…..thanks for being there …..

                Liked by 1 person

  9. For the longest time I’ve been told diabetes “runs in the family.” I can’t speak for previous generations but the one that includes my parents has not led a particularly active later adulthood and generally uses food for comfort.
    Your posts serve to remind me that I’m not at Fate’s mercy but my own. Thank you!
    Your consistency has helped me incorporate some great new habits!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Genetics plays a small role compared to lifestyle. Science is already proving that genetics can also be influenced through lifestyle choices making their EXPRESSION more or less likely.
      Glad to see you’re taking control of your life with new improved habits. It’s truly worth the effort.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Informative post, as always. Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Always a pleasure.

      Like

  11. It is so true, it seems that the root of the problem is not addressed instead medication is the answer! Thanks for the awareness!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The pharmaceutical industry is simply providing a lucrative option which the physicians AND CONSUMERS DEMAND. Until the consumer recognizes the harm in following this path AND is willing to commit themselves to a healthier alternative, the “addiction” to this form of “treatment” will prevail.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I have been working on my high cholesterol for a few years without medication and it has helped.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. You are a testimony proving our destiny can be chosen by directing our own actions and intentions to producing healthy end results. I am proud of you.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. I am still working on it and I try to eat 3 fruits before noon, cut my sat. fat and total fat. At least I am trying this first. Thanks Jonathan

            Liked by 1 person

  12. Inflammation seems to crop up as part of a lot of diseases lately. Is it me, or are there a lot more diseases lately? I barely remember hearing about cancer, MS. Lupus, or diabetes when I was a kid. It seems like our lifestyles have opened the door to some things we can take steps to curb.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Our society likes to create names for various conditions. Polio was a big one. With the introduction of the diagnosis Encephalitis the rate of Polio dramatically reduced. Unfortunately Encephalitis (brain swelling) was a result of some Polio victims; NOT A NEW CONDITION. Some find it interesting that as the polio vaccine was used to “combat” polio, cases of Encephalitis increased SUBSTANTIALLY. Statistically, calling “Polio” “Encephalitis” added credibility to the vaccine because it made it appear the number of polio victims diminished. Who thinks to scrutinize the factual accuracy of the CDC charts?
      As far as inflammation is concerned, we are learning more about the disease mechanisms that lead to this outcome. There are two ways to handle inflammation. 1. Treat its symptoms and maintain chronic inflammation or 2. Prevent inflammation with lifestyle. Diabetes is a perfect example of choice #1. People living a lifestyle that promotes health and wellness choose #2. It’s not that people are clueless; they are unwilling to commit themselves to doing what is needed in favor of doing what is WANTED (at a very steep price!)

      Liked by 1 person

      1. As a society, we’re expecting instant gratification without any effort.

        Liked by 1 person

  13. Good informative post 😃

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Great post as usual. My question to you is enough being done to find a cure? This is such a cash cow (and potentially growing bigger by the day) the cynical writer in me can image a cure being found and supressed to keep the money flowing. Please, tell me I can ignore my over active imagination.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. The consumer must realize the pharmaceutical industry has never claimed responsibility for developing cures. They are a business following a business model. If the business model for generating revenue and satisfying investors makes more sense to develop new drugs that address symptoms (ex. blood glucose and A1C levels) they will do just that. They are not obligated to develop cures. The consumer doesn’t understand this because the pharmaceutical company isn’t DIRECTLY supplying the drug to the patient. The doctor is seen as the kind professional with the patient’s best interest in mind supplying the drugs. If a doctor deviated from this protocol, they would be fired and replaced with one willing to follow the pharmaceutical model. The consumer wrongly assumes that alternative viable options do not exist because their doctor would “certainly” share a less costly (physically and financially) option if one existed!
      Our medical system is one of the BEST when it comes to acute emergency care. This is their forte. Chronic diseases (ex. high blood pressure, diabetes, obesity, etc…) frequently resulting from consumer lifestyle choices will never be corrected following the traditional pharmaceutical model. It simply isn’t designed with this purpose in mind.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. That is sad. The chronic diseases you mentioned are growing out of control in our country. You’re going to tell me the realsolution for these chronic diseases is better education starting at an early age.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. I don’t have to say a word; you did a beautiful job for me. 🙂
          Have a wonderful 4th of July

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Smiling. Thanks. Have a great Fourth of July.

            Liked by 1 person

            1. You as well! 🙂

              Liked by 1 person

  15. Doc, your posts are so educational and interesting. The “cure” for diabetes, as you state in your post, is all the things I think most of us know deep down intuitively and were all taught as kids. Eat right, eat all your vegetables, deserts in moderation, no cookies before your meal, that means you won’t eat your vegetables because it will spoil your appetite, go outside and exercise, get away from that TV, quit playing those video games, it’s a beautiful afternoon, go play ball with your friends, etc etc. Same applies to us as adults. If we stay inside and watch TV all night after working in an office all day, and eat our dinners at fast food restaurants, is it any wonder there is an obesity and diabetes epidemic?! Your posts apply the science and medicine to so many things that area really common sense. Thanks

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for your kind words. People have a tendency to let their emotions control their actions. Does it make sense that a person filled with PASSION and PURPOSE pursuing all the opportunities that life has to offer would choose a path a self destruction? People’s lives are severely UNBALANCED and therefore, seeking ANY JOYFUL experience even if its results add to the problems one already possesses. This is one reason I approach health from a perspective greater than simply diet and exercise.

      Like

  16. Another fascinating post! Thanks (as always) for sharing!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Always a pleasure to share a perspective from an angle few are aware of to offer hope and potentially better options to those in need.

      Like

  17. I really appreciate your blog and the work you do to educate your readers. You’re a breath of fresh air in a field where the focus is on treating symptoms instead of getting rid of symptoms via healthy living. I wish you were my doctor (or my neighbor…I’d just pop my head over the fence now and then and pick your brain).

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Although it requires stretching your neck a tad further than “next door,” you are always welcomed to pick my brain about any subject of interest. I have learned as much from LISTENING to people as I have taught them sharing my perspectives.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you so much! I will put you on my “go to” list when I have questions or want to bounce ideas off someone who may have some non-traditional ideas or fresh (better) approaches.

        Liked by 1 person

  18. I would like to know the effects of these muscle formulas.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I apologize, but I am not sure what effects your referring to. I do not understand your question about “muscle Formulas.”

      Like

      1. I meant the negative effects on one’s health should the person take muscle formulas

        Liked by 1 person

        1. If you are referring to substances like corticosteroids and prescriptive growth hormones, the damage to vital ORGANS is very well known and documented. Many elite athletes have done permanent damage impairing their quality of living. Others, have even died as a result of abuse. People need to step back and evaluate the “BIG PICTURE” before they act to prevent potentially devastating outcomes.

          Like

          1. Yh…. formulas taken by body builders and athletes

            Liked by 1 person

  19. Lots of good and practical information here Jonathan and you are so right about using diet and lifestyle as a first line of defense against diabetes. Medication can be helpful in some cases but as you mention, can also be very dangerous and lead people away from a healthy past.

    I’m wondering if you have any insight in to the natural supplements that claim to reduce insulin and if they would be a good accompaniment to better diet and fitness? The one I am thinking of i called Cinsulin.

    Liked by 1 person

  20. Cinsulin is a more complicated form of cinnamon. The problem with any product associated with glucose metabolism or improving insulin sensitivity is the other factors in people’s lives. Are they continuing to follow a detrimental lifestyle, but adding a couple of these capsules to their diet? Is a 300lb person taking the same dosage as a 105lb person?
    My belief is more simple:
    1. Start with lifestyle changes that promote healthy living. (Food, exercise, stress reduction, proper sleep, proper hydration, social interactions. (Overall Purpose: Physical AND Mental)
    2. Supplement as needed to support a healthy lifestyle (vitamins, neutraceuticals, extracts, etc…)
    3. See how far this protocol takes the individual.
    4. If health complications remain, try adding natural HEALTHY remedies (homeopathic, ayurvedic, herbal, etc…)
    5. If health complications remain try a pharmaceutical approach to see if its effects help complete what has already been achieved.

    Liked by 1 person

  21. Great slide of insulin insulin resistance. Patients only understand the tip of the iceberg. I love the bleeding analogy!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for taking the time to review this article. I appreciate your positive feedback. Your personal (as well as professional) input is always welcomed.

      Liked by 1 person

  22. Thank you for this article; I have had insulin resistance (following PCOS) for at least ten years; this article is the clearest explanation I have yet had. I am attempting to follow a low carb/ carb free diet- struggling somewhat, particularly with breakfast. Any suggestions. I laso had ulcerative colitis 45 years ago and have had an ileostomy ever since. I’m sure that no large intestine affects my nutritional needs. I would be grateful for any help. I have taken Metformin for ?? ten years, but my insulin remains high. I also had an overactive thyroid, multinodular goitre, but so far, since inradiation it’s function has been normal. I would appreciate any help!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for taking the time to read this article. It certainly sounds like you’ve battled some serious health problems over the years.

      When I see various systemic problems the first thing I do is get a DETAILED history on a person to find the CAUSES of various deficiencies that lead to various health imbalances (ex. diabetes, ulcerative colitis, thyroid.) Attempting to look at each “condition” as a separate incident usually misses the BIG PICTURE.

      In your case, I would encourage you to RESEARCH the term “FUNCTIONAL MEDICINE.” You can google Dr. Mark Hymen and check his website to see if a CERTIFIED FUNCTIONAL doctor is near you. They would evaluate you as a WHOLE PERSON rather than a diabetic with chronic colon issues and a thyroid that required radiation. This approach gets YOU, the patient, involved in the care and has provided excellent results in many difficult CHRONIC cases.

      If you have any questions or concerns, feel free to contact me through my contact tab at the top of my home page.

      Liked by 1 person

  23. Very helpful, thank you. By the way, I am not a diabetic, my sugar is fine, hence my concern about the insulin resistance. You had a very helpful article about exercise- starting slowly, building up … I can’t find it, I’ve searched your tag “exercise”. Any suggestions?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m not certain, but the following link may be the article you’re referring to:
      https://allabouthealthychoices.wordpress.com/2016/02/03/exercise-meets-goldilocks/

      Like

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