Can Quality Sleep Be A Factor In Preventing Diabetes?

Insomnia

When people hear the term, “Healthy Lifestyle” they often think about nutrition and exercise. Although these components are certainly important, they don’t complete the picture of healthy living. One of the most often overlooked components is QUALITY RESTFUL SLEEP. Reduced sleep affects the body more significantly than most people realize. In addition to loss of clarity (grogginess) sleep deprivation has become associated with blood sugar problems (Pre-Diabetes and Diabetes). There are two interesting mechanisms causing this:

  1. When people are tired they often turn to food (consciously and sub-consciously) as a source of fuel for energy. When poor food choices are selected (especially before bedtime) blood sugar levels commonly elevate. To reduce these levels, the body calls on the kidneys to excrete this excess sugar through urination. This night time “trip to the bathroom” causes sleep interruption complicating a normal sleep pattern in a person already sleep deprived. This recurring pattern can lead to abnormal blood sugar levels resulting in Diabetes over time.

  2. Sleep deprivation can also affect the body’s “biological clock” causing disruption in its normal hormonal cycle. When we achieve restful sleep (for approximately 7-9 hours,) insulin is released in the body to remove excess sugar from the blood. When sleep is compromised it alters the body’s ability to utilize the insulin circulating in the body. This is known as INSULIN RESISTANCE. This recurring pattern can lead to abnormal blood sugar levels resulting in Diabetes over time.

Whether poor sleep quality causes elevated blood sugar or is the result of elevated blood sugar, we can see the important role sleep plays in maintaining GOOD HEALTH and its role in preventing the onset of Diabetes.

Master-3-620x350

A project I am working on will minimize my access to wordpress over the next few days. I look forward to returning the early part of next week. Enjoy the rest of the week! 🙂

Advertisements

54 comments

  1. Reblogged this on Simple Living Over 50 and commented:
    Excellent information on sleep and general health.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Thank you for sharing this message. It is one that can positively affect many lives. Wishing you much success on your latest approach to addressing diabetes and weight loss.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Well said… Highly vital to realize the importance of optimum number of sleeping hours in our daily lives..thanks for sharing!!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Sometimes people leave out the simple parts of the puzzle that affects the quality of our lives. Many don’t realize how important QUALITY sleep is.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. […] at All About Healthy Choices Dr. Jonathan blogged about sleep today.  It’s worth your time to hop on over there and read […]

    Like

  4. Oh, man, how I love my sleep!!! Unfortunately, I struggle with insomnia sometimes and I gotta say it is maddening!!! There is nothing I hate worse, or find to drains me of energy quicker than lack of sleep. The worst!

    Thinking that bad sleep might cause diabetes is scary, because it seems like there is so much that plays into a bad sleep episode. Thanks for this post. I’m sharing it on my blog today.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Learning to “quiet” our minds can take skill, patience and learning. Yoga and meditation are two adjuncts that have helped many overcome their sleeping problems.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. having apnea and unable to use the CPAP machines/masks – my sleep has been bad (to say the last) forever. and I have diabetes … you may be on to something………

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I’m sorry to hear this. Sleep apnea can be a serious condition. I hope you have found someone willing to help you come up with a solution.

      Like

      1. I sleep head elevated – about the best I can do. any “sleep aids” also hinder breathing – not something I need … so, I take what I can get … like usual.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. An exceptional article. I have heard about the connection between sleep deprivation and links to higher chances of getting diabetes, but I did not know much the connections works. Thank you for sharing!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. This is the type of information people can share with family and friends. Spreading these simple messages can truly positively affect many lives.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. This is really interesting. I really need to make an effort to get more sleep, because I am way under the amount I should be getting (as my Fitbit confirms for me every day).

    Liked by 2 people

    1. It is truly worth making the effort to improve this aspect that effects the quality of health and life.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. I like this post and thank you for sharing that chart on hours of sleep. It has been well documented on my blog the struggles I have had with sleep. Well, since I started a more
    active lifestyle, walking and exercising, that part of my life has improved as well. There are plenty of nights where I do achieve 8 hours of sleep. And that TOO makes me stronger and happier.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. It’s amazing how the different components of life that promote good health can synergistically propel our lives to new levels of wellness and happiness.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. I find this so incredibly interesting, I had no idea !!! Thank goodness I get my full quota of sleep !

    Liked by 2 people

    1. More beneficial than you probably realized

      Like

  10. I’m ready for a nap!

    Liked by 3 people

  11. thank you for sharing this excelllent information
    ps: happy to discover and follow your blog
    anita
    🙂
    https://femmeetinfos.wordpress.com

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much. I like the way you designed your blog and appreciate the beauty in the jewelry and design.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. you’re welcome
        and I thank you very much too for good appreciation
        Have a nice day
        anita
        🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  12. If you take an occassional nap, like on weekends, does this help you carch up on rest? I am over 50, and don’t do it often.

    Like

    1. According to the research, naps do count. It is important however, that the sleep cycle and its duration remain consistent and range between (approximately) 7-9 hours for adults.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Will watch this. Thank you.

        Liked by 1 person

  13. […] Can Quality Sleep Be A Factor In Preventing Diabetes? […]

    Liked by 1 person

  14. […] Can Quality Sleep Be A Factor In Preventing Diabetes? […]

    Liked by 1 person

  15. This topic is right on time. I was just complaining about how tired I was because I was woken up in the middle of the night by a mosquito buzzing in my ear and the AC was not cool enough so I was hot and sweating:( I have to make sure to get at least 7 hours of sleep tonight;)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Quality sleep is so often overlooked when attempting to live a healthier lifestyle. Hope your conditions improve (more air and fewer mosquitoes) to help you achieve the sleep you need.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Very important:) Mosquito gone and cooler air has come;)

        Liked by 1 person

  16. Great point! I am actually preparing to write my thesis on the affects on appetite after consuming stevia vs. aspartame for people at risk for diabetes. I wonder what we will find as we learn more about the disease and diet!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That should be an interesting paper. In general, I don’t consider adult onset diabetes (in most cases) a disease. I consider it a response by the body and a failure in maintaining endocrine homeostasis. When a condition is caused or aggravated by personal behavior, calling it a disease minimizes the personal responsibility people associate with the condition.
      Please, keep me up on your research. Thank you.

      Liked by 1 person

  17. Very interesting and informative!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It is nice to know my articles are not a cure for insomnia! 😀 . I always appreciate your comments.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. hahaha that is a good one! They are the right length and interesting as well

        Liked by 1 person

  18. Sharron · · Reply

    I found point 1. very interesting – perhaps I need to rethink that piece of chocolate (or two!) before bed ….

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Interestingly, quality dark chocolate (I like to recommend a minimum of 80% cocoa) in small amounts 1-2 ounces can add a powerful anti oxidant component to your meal plan while satisfying the rich flavor of chocolate. Many people sit and eat MEALS filled with processed carbohydrates late at night. These are the foods to avoid.

      Like

  19. Does it help to take naps? I do not sleep enough and have to som shut eye when ever I can.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Naps are beneficial. It is important, however, to always address the underlying issues. Compensating can only produce a limited result. Is the sleep issue related to stress, nutritional deficiencies, hormonal imbalances, etc… Finding the ROOT CAUSES of issues and CORRECTING THEM restores the body to a healthy state.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you for your reply, I guess in my case it is a mix of many tings.

        Liked by 1 person

  20. I know that so many things are linked to a healthy lifestyle but it isn’t until you put it into direct and straight forward terms that I realise just how it does affect.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. People have a difficult time with the concept of integration. We are more comfortable in terms of “cause and outcome.” The complexities of the human body rely on ALL systems working in balance to achieve good health. This is why we can’t focus on one area of weakness (ex. diet) and expect the whole body to respond. We must incorporate ALL the different components to achieve physical, mental and emotional well being.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Well said Doc. All systems must work in order for things to be good and the penny drops – a BALANCED lifestyle….

        Liked by 1 person

  21. I also heard about the link between night shift workers and diabetes.
    Can you expand on this? Your feedback is greatly appreciated.

    LIVE ❤ LAUGH … BELLE PAPILLON

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Based on my research and understanding, night shift workers are prone to metabolic disturbances even when compared with similar eating patterns of daytime employees. Night time workers consistently showed impaired glucose tolerance and increased insulin levels. A prolonged pattern of this profile could result in Type II Diabetes. Dietary and other lifestyle habits are important to develop and maintain for those people working these shifts. Under the guidance of a licensed professional monitoring their lab panels, these people might respond better to a ketogenic style of diet while maintaining a regular exercise program to assist the process of burning blood sugar. It is possible our circadian rhythms alter our metabolic activities resulting in these increased health risk findings.
      If you have any other questions, don’t hesitate to ask. Thank you for adding your comment to this post.

      Liked by 1 person

  22. Thanks for your feedback, Doc.
    I was trying to reblog this but it won’t show up on my site. I must be doing something wrong. I’m new at this. Ugh! So frustrating. It’s my first reblog. Fail!

    I was concerned about the effects of sleep in relation to diabetes but more recently I’m more focused on the link between sleep and it’s link/effect on mental health. I’m a Psychiatric-MH RN and I have been seeing more and more patients who’s HPI or chief complaints that resulted in psychosis was not sleeping for several days. So go figure.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Quality sleep is a crucial component of good health. Sleep deprivation creates hormonal imbalances, weakens immune function, impedes normal tissue repair, creates metabolic disorders and the list goes on. Most people don’t realize the role in plays in normal healthy function and believe that pharmaceutical sleeping aids can deal with the issue. People need to realize their bodies are NOT DEFICIENT in PRESCRIPTION MEDICATIONS; they are deficient (often) in lifestyle necessities that produce normal rest and quality sleep.

      Liked by 1 person

  23. Thanks! Your posts are pretty interesting.
    I just gave you a “follow”. Looking forward to your newer posts…

    Carpe diem!
    LIVE ❤ LAUGH … Belle Papillon

    Liked by 1 person

  24. Welcome to this amazing community of bloggers. I welcome your professional and personal responses to any of my articles. The purpose is to gain better insight and knowledge from eachother’s experiences. Thank you for choosing to follow my site. I appreciate the time you take to view my material.

    Like

  25. I wish I could sleep more. My body is programmed for 6 hours a night-max. Whatever time I sleep I find myself awake at 4 am.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Many factors affect sleep. Most people try to take “something” to overcome the mechanism interfering with the normal sleep cycle. Some of the factors that need to be addressed may include:
      1. Stress, 2. Exercise, 3. Types of food and diet, 4. Nervous system imbalance (nerve interference,) 5. hydration. The synergistic effect of these various components can often help correct sleeping disorders.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you. I realized that even though I was sleeping 6 hours a night, I was still tired through out the day because I was up by 3 in the morning. But since I adjusted to sleeping at 11pm, to be up at 5. I feel better.

        Liked by 1 person

Your comment can positively impact the lives of others.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: