TIME FOR AN OIL CHANGE?

Cooking-oils-2Recently, I have written several articles discussing nutrition planning for healthier lifestyles. My meal planning recommendations have always applied the principles of common sense, balance and practicality. I equate this style of meal planning TO BORING financial investing; LOW RISK, GRADUAL POSITIVE CHANGE, SUCCESS OUTCOME. The research world is beginning to taut a new style of meal planning encouraging high fat diets to achieving healthier outcomes. Although there is merit to this form of meal planning, there is greater potential dangers for heart disease, diabetes and cancer if not followed PROPERLY. High fat diets require restricting carbohydrates (other than fruits and vegetables primarily) to such a degree, LONG TERM compliance for the majority of people seems unlikely. If a high fat diet is combined with starchy carbohydrates and sugary desserts, the risk of disease magnifies greatly. This means pizza, subs, burger rolls, white potatoes, white rice, pastries, ice cream, candy, cake, muffins, etc… would no longer be consumed except for those special occasions. Research MUST take into account, REALITY and PRACTICALITY. This is why my recommendations (although requiring some discipline and some self sacrifice) are more likely to achieve better results for most people. If you didn’t previously read my recommendations, you can find it at the link below:

High Dietary Fat: The Answer To Better Health?

Regardless of the meal plan you choose, understanding the differences between OILS is critical for health. For years, the food industry has marketed vegetable oils as the healthiest choice to prevent heart disease. These included corn, soybean, canola, cottonseed, sunflower or safflower oil. The reality is, these oils are dangerous, especially if used to cook foods at higher temperatures. These oils contain high amounts of processed polyUNsaturaed fats.

MonoUNsaturated fat and SAturated fat are more stable compounds than polyUNsaturated fat. There is a great deal of processing involved in developing PolyUNsaturated oils that cause them to break down and become rancid requiring refining, deodorizing and bleaching. Once the processing is completed, this part of the oil remains a concern due to its unstable composition and its dangerous oxidative properties when heated (it becomes rancid again.)

Oils higher in monoUnsaturated fats including olive oil and avocado oil are healthier stable oils that offer nutrients that protect against cancer, heart disease and diabetes. Avocado oil has one of the highest smoke points and is one of the best monoUnsaturated fats for low to medium temperature cooking. Cold pressed extra virgin olive oil is NOT a good choice as a cooking oil. It is best used as an added oil to cooked foods and raw salads.

SAturated oils are best for higher temperature cooking. Good healthy SAturated oils would include coconut oil, ghee and lard. Butter is also a saturated fat, but would NOT be a healthy choice when cooking at high temperatures. Until recently, these were the oils that were considered the most dangerous for health over the last 30 years.

Having this information should make your choice of healthier oils simpler. Remember, ALL oils are HIGH IN CALORIES! They average approximately 120 calories per tablespoon. They should be used appropriately keeping this in mind. In addition, foods such as salmon, mackerel, trout, sardines and albacore tuna are good sources of healthy omega 3 fats that also provide protection against disease and inflammation. Plant based sources include walnuts, pumpkin seeds, chia, hemp, broccoli, bok choy, and brussel sprouts.

Fats, in general, play an important role in health. They are NOT to be feared, yet the typical American diet doesn’t utilize the right fats in the right quantities to promote healthy living. With a better understanding of oil as well as guidelines for safer healthier use, I hope this information helps you determine whether it is:

TIME FOR AN OIL CHANGE?

chef-pouring-olive-oil-on-a-salad

Bon Appetit

 

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38 comments

  1. Good information. I love learning about all the different oils available. Lots to choose from these days.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Oils are a win-win if used properly. They provide healthful benefits and add flavor to cooking. People simply need to remember they are calorie dense and require sensible application to minimize unnecessary calorie consumption.

      Liked by 2 people

  2. I love learning about oils because I frequently cook with them and enjoy trying different “infused” flavors. I use olive oil the most though. Are you saying it’s not good to cook with because of it’s low smoke point? Does it cause harm if you do?

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Olive oil is not a good oil to cook with because it can break down reducing the benefits of the oil. Low temperature cooking IS ok. Most people seem to cook at higher temperatures to reduce cooking time. It is much more likely to be harmful under this circumstance.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I have been told this before about olive oil and I use it at room temperature over salads. xo

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Olive oil can be used for cooking, but many people cook at relatively high temperatures denaturing the oil. Olive oil is a significantly better choice for cooking than ANY vegetable oil. I just figure, if we are going to cook, why not use the healthiest options with the best flavors? Common sense just makes common sense! πŸ™‚ Have a wonderful Sunday. (Keep making those healthy salads!) ❀

          Liked by 1 person

  3. Great advice on the oils. I had no idea that high temperatures could change the oil and its health value. I cook my stir frys in sea same oil. Wondering now if that’s a good choice.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. When I was in college, I used sesame oil as well. Expeller pressed avocado oil (a great source on MONO saturated) or coconut oil (a great source of SATURATED {medium chain triglycerides} fat are my personal two favorites when cooking with higher temperatures. Between these two oils, the avocado is the most stable at higher temperatures.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thanks for the advice. I will give it a try

        Liked by 1 person

  4. These days we have switched to rice bran oil and sometimes we use sunflower oil. Very informational post, πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Rice bran oil is less popular in the U.S. It offers a similar composition to olive oil with a slightly higher polyunsaturated composition. Sunflower oil is a highly processed oil with a much higher polyunsaturated profile. From a health perspective, I am a greater fan of the higher MONO unsaturated profile or MCT SATURATED fats like those found in coconut oil.

      Since you enjoy preparing various dishes, it would be interesting to see if some of these oils would change the flavor. I’m going to try some of the rice bran oil. It’s always fun to experiment. πŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      1. cool. Coconut oil tastes good too but it adds its flavor to the food, whenever i cook chinese, i prefer soybean oil, i will try to cook in coconut oil, unsure about regularly although. Thank you for the information. πŸ™‚ Nice to know!! we studied about lipids in our first year in biochemistry, honestly I have forgotten most of what i studied then by now 😦

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Great post!! Over here, Mediterranean countries use a lot of sunflower and olive oils… to fry :/
    Thank you for sharing! Big hug, David

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Sometimes it’s difficult to overcome cultural habits and traditions. Sometimes sharing different ideas helps create new approaches offering better outcomes. An open minded approach to life has helped me reach my current place. Learning from each other helps the mind grow and develop until we die.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. I donΒ΄t know what to say…
        Are we still talking about food?
        Traditions, open minds, new ideas, aproaches, and learning.
        I agree if we focus only on food πŸ™‚
        Big hug, David

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Food works for me. πŸ™‚

          Liked by 1 person

          1. Then, I agree absolutely πŸ™‚

            Liked by 1 person

  6. another informative post…I quit using olis a long time ago, of course I use olive oil and in a spritzer…thanks for being on top of all the healthy topics needing addressing…..kat

    Liked by 2 people

    1. That is a great method to use oil. I believe Misto is one of the manufacturers. I have several bottles for the different oils I use. Personally, I do not follow a higher fat diet and like to control my oil intake using these oils through spray bottles. I follow a balanced plan (slightly higher in protein.) I do NOT view carbs as the enemy. I eat 6-9 servings of vegetables and 2 servings of fruit daily. I will consume lentil beans (usually 1x/week,) quinoa (1-2X/week,) organic sweet potato (1-2X/week,) organic nine grain bread (4 slices/week,) I exercise and track my calorie burn with a heart monitor to make certain I provide adequate nutrition for my lifestyle needs. All of this becomes second nature with a little practice. I believe the benefits of living this lifestyle clearly outweigh the alternative lifestyle many unfortunately will face.

      Liked by 2 people

      1. that does sound very balanced…I cut out yeast products again as they are a trigger for binge eating…but I eat sweet potatoes and many other yummy carb related food in moderation….and vegies in great abundance….I could add more fruit, but the high sugar seems to also trigger my “I want more zone” LOL so I am careful…apples and maybe a small banana a couple times a week…I do like fruit in my salads….I also use cran/rasins from the local fruit stand and pomegranates….I find using the oil spritzer is a real good way to cut back….if people only realized what little oil they need to use for cooking they would be amazed….I always recommend to my frieinds to keep a teaspoon by there oil and measure it out….some call and are amazed at how much oil they used to use to what they use now!!!

        Liked by 1 person

  7. Avocado and olive oil are my favorites! We have coconut oil at home, too, but have not used it to cook with in a long time because it does change the flavor of things so I use it topically (hair and skin). I know that moderation is key, but I still can’t wrap my head around using lard to cook with because a family member used to do that all the time and I felt the food would end up too greasy:( But most of the patients I talk to are low income and, like you, I go with what is “reality and practicality”. Awesome post as usual:)

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Your choices of oil should work well for you. If the mind says “no,” don’t do it simply because the literature says its good for you. I’m sure you take enough positive steps in life to live healthy and FILLED with quality. I would like to see 10,000 more Nena’s to believe our world is beginning to understand the importance of lifestyles. Stay healthy and happy, my friend.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Haha! Dos Equis;) Thank you, Jonathan. I think the same of you:)

        Liked by 1 person

  8. I use my Misto when I cook with oil and I do try to avoid it. My doctor said to stir fry using water, but that doesn’t sound very appealing at all (like most things he suggests, lol). Generally, JP and I just grill everything to avoid the whole frying issue!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’ll bet your doctor isn’t famous for any culinary skills! πŸ™‚ Just be careful with the heat and burning of foods on the grill. The charring of meat causes acrylamide to form which potentially causes a health risk (since acrylamide is likely a carcinogenic compound.)

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  9. I use olive oil and coconut oil the most out of any of the oils. The olive oil took some getting use to but we made that transition a few years ago. We rarely fry anything anymore. The olive oil I use on baked Asparagus or stir fried zoodles. The coconut oil I have just added recently and it does leave its flavor on what your cooking so you have to make sure that the flavor will work with the food. I find that it is in a lot of the ketogenic recipes.

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    1. These are becoming the two most popular oils. Olive oil is mono UNsaturated and coconut oil is SAturated. Each offer health benefits. Ketogenic diets are based on high fat consumption including increased amounts of saturated fat. Those who know which foods to consume can do well using this approach. Those who mix processed foods and medium to higher starchy carbs can do themselves great harm.

      Light cooking at lower temperatures is fine with olive oil. Make sure your olive oil is “cold pressed” and extra virgin olive oil for maximal benefit.

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  10. Coconut oil and olive oil and well as avocado oil are my go-to oils if I need one, depending on what I need them to do. I am not afraid of fats and I don’t count calories. I burn a lot with my active lifestyle and if for some reason I don’t get enough activity in then I turn on Netflix and off I go on the treadmill until I feel I’ve had enough. Being informed about oils is so smart! Thanks for another great article. πŸ™‚

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    1. I am not surprised you’re well prepared. If I could motivate people to live a lifestyle half as healthy as yours, this world would be a happier and healthier place.

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  11. Thank you Jonathon. What do you think about light olive oil for baking?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. As long as the baking temperature is not too high,bit is fine. For hot temperature cooking I like Avocado oil. I prefer to use olive oil as a “cold” additive to gain the most from its nutritional value and flavor.

      Liked by 1 person

        1. Please let your husband know I’m impressed by his heightened awareness about the dangers of canola oil. Most people falsely believe this is a healthy vegetable oil high in “good” unsaturated fats. They do not realize the processing of this oil as well as the chances it contains GMO produces increased potential risks that can be avoided by using healthier sources of quality oils. Why gamble unnecessarily?

          Now I’m not sure if you married him for his looks or his brains? πŸ™‚

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          1. Ha! Ha! Don’t laugh. I married him because he was respectful to his mother. I figured, if he treats me the way he treats his mother, I will be alright. My husband finds that too practical. But, it made sense to me.πŸ’–.

            Liked by 1 person

            1. I love it!! πŸ˜€

              Liked by 1 person

  12. good post! I posted an oil change video on my page if anyone wanted to look at it. I have pictures to show what you are doing.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for sharing. I hope the readers take you up on your offer.

      Like

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